GRC examples


This page shows individual examples of GRC secondary clocks of all kinds. For general information about GRC systems, see the Standard Electric Time GRC synchronous secondary homepage. To view a GRC secondary movement disassembled, along with notes about adjustment and operation, see the GRC from the inside page.


original
FMT-10: 1962 #21, 1971 #11
FMT-12: 1955 #6, 1958 #7, 1958 #4, 1959 #2, 1962 #5
FMT-SQ-12: 1971 #3
RMT-12: 1960 #13, 1963 #8, 1963 #9, 1967 #10
FMT-16: 1959 #17
parts: CA-1 buzzer, Molex connector
 
outside
special: 5-inch panel GR
FMT-10: 1958 GR (ACCUMULATOR)
parts: 12-inch double-sided bracket, 24v Ingraham Z motor, components of 108-448 kit
random other examples
 
modified
FMT-12: #6-mod (GRC w/ lockout microswitch), 1963 #1 (scrap), 1967 #15 (scrap)
RMT-12: #9-mod, #8-mod
FMT-16: #12 (mod, scrap), #12b (scrap)


original/unmodified examples

#6: FMT-12 GR (original)

#6 front
#6 back#6 movement#6 movement#6 movement#6 back plate#6 back plate#6 movement#6 movement#6 movement#6 hands#6 hands#6 hands#6 hands#6 motors#6 G idler#6 art-deco dial

inspection date: April 29, 1955
system supply: 120v 60Hz
drive motor: Ingraham Z (11-54)
reset motor: Cramer 112 (12-54 / Dec 22, 1954)
buzzer: CA-1
 
This is the oldest GR(C) that I have ever seen in-person. (It came to me without any date stamp, so the year could rather have been 1956.)
 
These pictures show the original GR (no 12-hour correction assembly) secondary and movement. Note that the CA-1 buzzer has no identifying stamp, and the original idler gear even has a “G” stamped on it. Also shown is the large hole pressed out to make room for the reset cam, which appears on older back plates (pre-1958 or so) fitted with older GR(C) movements that have shorter standoffs.
 
I have seen—but failed to acquire—examples of the earliest style of GR secondary, so I decided to assemble one for a moment; that being the final picture with the art-deco dial.
 
All parts shown in the above pictures are believed to be entirely original to this clock, except: the movement dustcover (borrowed from #7; note that it does have the proper “GR” stamp, but the earliest GR covers may not have had any stamp) and screws, the plastic wire clip that disintegrated long ago (original screw shown in-place), and the art-deco dial in the last picture (borrowed from #14). (The numbered sticker with my name on it is also not original, obviously!)
 
((For the modified GRC version, see #6-mod below.))

#7: FMT-12 GRC

#7 front
#7 back#7 movement#7 movement#7 movement#7 movement#7 hand comparison#7 hand comparison#7 hand closeup

inspection date: June 10, 1958
system supply: 120v 60Hz
drive motor: Ingraham Z (7-56)
reset motor: Cramer 117 (10-57)
buzzer: CA-1
 
This one is also missing the date stamp (leaving the year in question), and any marked reference to the presence of the 12-hour correction mechanism (seems original, though). They were, at the very least, still using the “GR” dustcover stamp.
 
This is one of the clocks in which I tried to capture the front of the movement reflected in the zinc back plate, as Gary did with his FMT-10 “ACCUMULATOR” GR shown below. A clear view of the front of the movement is also shown, demonstrating the difference between the GR and GRC types.
 
Note that this particular unit is fitted with a minute hand that has the counterweight mounted too far out. Also, one of the dial mounting screws is different. There does not seem to be anything else different about any other parts. I always suspected this all to be a factory mistake (and I wonder how many more there are out there—I have never seen another minute hand like this).
 
This clock is believed to have all original parts, as shown.

#4: FMT-12 “ANTI-SCATTER” GRC

#4 front
#4 back#4 movement#4 movement#4 movement#4 movement

inspection date: December 1958
system supply: 120v 60Hz
drive motor: Ingraham Z (5-58)
reset motor: Synchron 640 (2-58)
buzzer: CA-1
 
This is one of my favorite clocks; it is an excellent example of what I consider to be the best period in the history of these things.
 
This clock is believed to have all original parts, as shown.

#17: FMT-16 “ANTI-SCATTER” GRC

#17 front
#17 back#17 movement#17 movement

inspection date: January 08, 1959
system supply: 120v 60Hz
drive motor: Ingraham Z (7-56) ((not believed to be a misreading))
reset motor: Synchron 640 (2-58)
buzzer: never installed
crystal: Lucite (acrylic)
notes: zinc back plate rubbed dull before stamp was applied
 
This clock is believed to have all original parts, as shown.

#2: FMT-12 “Flexchron” GRC

#2
#2 front#2 back#2 movement#2 movement

inspection date: May 20, 1959
system supply: 120v 60Hz
drive motor: Ingraham Z (2-59)
reset motor: Synchron 640 (3-59)
buzzer: CA-1
 
This is the first GRC that I ever got my hands on, so it has been through a lot (my fault, in most cases). Otherwise, the originally shiny zinc back plate was strangely weather-damaged (not so much strange really, but exactly how zinc weathers when exposed to a bad environment) before I received it. This is the clock that was disassembled for the GRC from the inside pictures. I ran this clock nearly constantly from March 2004 until summer-2012; it’s still my faithful standby.
 
Did you notice that the cloth-covered buzzer wires are orange on clocks marked “Flexchron” (see also #13) but dark-green on the older units?
 
This clock is believed to have all original parts, except the second hand (from #1; the original is quite short but of equivalent manufacture) and the bezel clips (from #14; the originals are too rusty).

#13: RMT-12 “Flexchron” GRC

#13 front
#13 back#13 movement#13 movement

inspection date: March 11, 1960
system supply: 120v 60Hz
drive motor: Ingraham Z (5-59)
reset motor: Synchron 640 (11-59)
buzzer: CA-1
 
This is one of the cheapest clocks I have ever bought (in a lot with #15); it is the one on which I stuck a lamp cord and took with me when I lived in the dorm; and it’s also the closest date-match to the ones that I spent so much time staring at in school (except those were FMTs without buzzers).
 
Note that the number 104 is stamped on some of these because “GR-104” is the proper part number for the movement back plate (has nothing to do with my habit of making “room 104” my living room!).
 
This clock is believed to have had all original parts, except the newer reset ratchet pawl (with brass weight) that is shown in the pictures. The original one looks identical to the others from this time period (with the separate spacer on the shaft and no weight). I have since put the original one back in—it suffered from gunky oil residue where no oil should have ever been, that I finally got around to soaking out. Also, the case is in worse condition than it seems in pictures.

#5: FMT-12

#5
#5 front#5 back#5 movement#5 movement

inspection date: July 17, 1962
system supply: 24v 60Hz
drive motor: Synchron 610 (6-62)
reset motor: Haydon
buzzer: never installed
notes: “GR-C-24V AC” and “GR-24 V.A.C.”
 
This particular clock came with the original SET shipping carton (see the SET FMT backboxes and accessories page), but does not seem to belong to that box; it, nonetheless, seems to have had very little usage. Sadly, however, every beat-nearly-to-death Ingraham Z movement still runs better than any Synchron movement, in my opinion, this one included.
 
Note the blue wire on the original 24v Synchron drive motor.
 
This clock is believed to have had all original parts, except the dial is original to #1 (with the slight browning above the center hole as though the drive motor caught fire or something). It may get its nice bright dial back, someday. Also, the Molex connector (and ground wire) shown in the pictures is not original to this clock.

#21: FMT-10

#21 front
#21 front (old)#21 back#21 movement#21 movement

inspection date: July 24, 1962
system supply: 24v 60Hz
drive motor: Synchron 610 (1-77)
reset motor: Haydon
buzzer: never installed
notes: “GR-C-24V AC”, but shown with 120v motors
 
I just had to have a 10-inch with the normal international-modern dial (and I just happened to get it for a good price).
 
Despite the strongly matching dates of these two 24vac GRCs (#5 and #21), I am almost certain that they were not originally installed in the same building. It is a rather interesting coincidence that I ended up with both of them, however.
 
This clock is believed to have had all original parts, except the 120v motors that came with #1 shown in the pictures (the originals look identical, including the replaced drive motor with black wire). The piece of black tape is covering the same “GR-24 V.A.C.” stamp that #5 has (honestly!).

#8: RMT-12

#8 front
#8 back#8 movement#8 movement#8 movement (loose)#8 movement (loose)#8 movement (loose)

inspection date: April 10, 1963
system supply: 120v 60Hz
drive motor: Synchron 610 (1-77)
reset motor: Haydon
buzzer: never installed
 
This clock (and #9 and #13) has the original one-piece RMT case that just makes movement servicing very difficult, to say the least. You can see the pieces of the original plastic wire clip lingering around on the back plate, meaning that I probably hadn’t had this one apart at that time.
 
You may notice that the hole for the seconds shaft on the zinc back plate is egged-out to the point that it almost causes problems. They didn’t use zinc or aluminum (without a brass bushing) for very long, so they must have realized that would happen so quickly. When I rebuilt this clock, I decided to leave that shiny zinc movement whole and loose, so anyone who comes to visit me will get to put his grimy fingerprints on it!
 
I bought #8, #9, and #10 from the same person, so it is possible that they came from the same building/complex.
 
This clock is believed to have had all original parts, as shown. ((For the modified version, see #8-mod below.))

#9: RMT-12

#9 front
#9 back#9 movement#9 movement

inspection date: April 04, 1963
system supply: 120v 60Hz
drive motor: Synchron 610 (4-72)
reset motor: Haydon
buzzer: never installed
 
Note that the original dial is printed without the logo. Does anyone know why some were made like this? Other than the dial, this one would have originally been a twin of #8, including the shiny zinc movement plates. My theory is that the back plate was replaced along with the drive motor, using the 1968+ 108-448 repair kit, but the person who did that left out the new adjustment pillar.
 
((For the modified version, see #9-mod below.))

#10: RMT-12

#10 front
#10 back#10 movement#10 movement

inspection date: June 15, 1967
system supply: 120v 60Hz
drive motor: (off-brand replacement)
reset motor: Standard
buzzer: never installed
notes: inspected the day after the sale of SET to Johnson was announced
 
Despite the poor operating condition of this movement, I have not yet had it apart. Either everyone over at the factory was really angry that day, or someone super-glued the second hand on (and I haven’t decided how I want to pull it apart without breaking or bending anything). This movement is more-or-less identical to the original from #15.
 
This is also one of the newer separate RMT cases, which uses the same back plate as the FMT cases. (Whether I rebuild the movement first, or steal the rim and bracket to convert a good FMT to surface-mount first, is the real question…)
 
This clock is believed to have all original parts (even complete with some original gunk!), except the replaced drive motor.

#3: FMT-SQ-12 (Tempo)

#3 front
#3 back#3 movement#3 movement#3 movement

inspection date: March 1971 ((possibly a misreading))
system supply: 120v 60Hz
drive motor: Synchron 610
reset motor: Synchron 640 (5-70)
buzzer: no mounting holes
notes: model 100-628
 
I have to say that this particular clock actually has a rather nicely-running movement overall, compared to other Johnson ones. You may also notice that I had to drill some holes and add a couple small bolts to hold the bezel brackets on after I broke the tabs—I tend to think it is actually better this way. It is quite surprising that this is the only set of those tabs that I have broken so far. The bolt and nut holding the drive motor on isn’t original either.
 
Note that all Johnson 12- and 16-inch models mount in a 10-inch backbox.
 
This clock does have about the most interesting piece of glass—it rather makes me want some older (normal international-modern SET) square cases.
 
This clock is believed to have all original parts, except that the drive motor seems to be a recent replacement and as otherwise noted. Should also have a Molex connector, but did not have one when I bought it.

#11: FMT-10 (Tempo)

#11 front
#11 back#11 movement#11 movement

inspection date: March 1971 ((possibly a misreading))
system supply: 120v 60Hz
drive motor: Synchron 610 (2-71)
reset motor: Synchron 640 (6-70)
buzzer: no mounting holes
notes: model 100-361
 
This is my first 10-inch clock, also the last clock I bought before my first LTR8-128—a lot of things happened in that first year. And it’s not the light, the glass really is deeply scratched on this one.
 
This clock is believed to have all original parts, but should also have a Molex connector.

parts: CA-1 buzzer

CA-1 buzzer detail
#4 buzzer detail

The first picture shows the opposite sides of two disassembled 120v (coil stamped “115-VAC”) type CA-1 buzzers—the one from #2 May 1959 (top, orange wires) and an older one (bottom, green wires). The second picture shows the buzzer in #4 from the top of the movement. The CA-1 buzzer was also available with a coil wound for 24vac.
 
In my opinion, the CA-1 buzzers are the perfect loudness for normal-size residential rooms.

parts: Molex connectors

Molex connector set
Molex connector setMolex connector setMolex connector setoriginal motor set with Molex connectorsplastic wire clip

Shown are various views of the Molex connector set installed with all GRC systems starting in the late-1960s. The building side is the one with the wings allowing it to clip into an appropriately-sized hole (not used); and I have somehow only ended up with exactly one of these. Note that I believe that the actual six-pin Molex connector of this size is still a stock item that can be ordered from electronics distributors (I will try that, someday), but the wires pressed into the connectors shown here is as-delivered by the factory.
 
Also shown is an original motor set, removed from #12b 1974 Johnson 24vac GRC that had a bad drive motor, showing that the connectors were crimped directly to the original motor leads.
 
The final picture shows one of the plastic wire clips that were originally screwed to the underside of the movement front plates, before the late-1960s, along with its screw (this screw removed from most of my movements because it is the same size as the dustcover screws that are often missing). This is the only clip that I was ever able to remove intact, and it is certainly too brittle to use. This same part was also commonly used by American electronics manufacturers (I have, specifically, seen an identical part holding down the power cord in Magnavox consoles).


other examples (not owned by me… unfortunately!)

special: 5-inch panel-mount GR

5-inch panel-mount GR front
5-inch panel-mount GR back5-inch panel-mount GR movement5-inch panel-mount GR reset motor5-inch panel-mount GR spacer5-inch panel-mount GR bezel5-inch panel-mount GR hands

system supply: 120v 60Hz
drive motor: Synchron 610 (not original)
reset motor: Cramer 112 (12-54)
buzzer: no mounting holes
notes: owned by Gary Spohn
 
This may well be an original factory one-off, a GR movement mounted in a 5-inch case that appears to be the type that would have been panel-mounted in an industrial control console (i.e. as would be used at a plant). This specific clock was, supposedly, originally owned by Herbert P. Blake, who was the vice-president in charge of sales at SET until 1956.
 
This is an original GR movement without 12-hour correction; note that the original Cramer 112 reset motor has a 12-54 date stamp—possibly from the same purchase batch as the one in my #6, in other words. The shadow of the setting instruction sticker is also the same trapezoid shape as the original front plate to #6. The dustcover has no stamp, and has a rubber grommet rather than the pressed-on brass ring. It appears to me that the hour hand is made for this size dial but the minute and second hands were cut down from 10-inch pieces before they were painted (note: Gary says they don’t look cut off, and I haven’t seen this one in-person—maybe someday). However, unfortunately, this movement seems to have been “repaired” with one of those 108-448 kits, so that aluminum back plate and its associated parts are certainly not original.

FMT-10 “ACCUMULATOR” GR

FMT-10 ACCUMULATOR GR front
FMT-10 ACCUMULATOR GR backFMT-10 ACCUMULATOR GR movementFMT-10 ACCUMULATOR GR movement

system supply: 120v 60Hz
drive motor: Ingraham Z
reset motor: Cramer 117
buzzer: never installed
notes: owned by Gary Spohn
 
Here is an example of an “ACCUMULATOR” GR with what appears to be all original equipment. At least, this proves that the ACCUMULATOR (GR) and ANTI-SCATTER (GRC) stamps were in-use by April 1958.
 
Less importantly, this will also have to suffice as an example of the zinc back plate in the 10-inch size, since I don’t even have one of those yet.

parts: 12-inch double-sided bracket

12-inch double-sided bracket w/ FMT-1212-inch double-sided bracket12-inch double-sided bracket

Also from Gary, his double-sided bracket and a loose one that he sold on eBay a while back (I would have bought it too, but someone else was just slightly crazier than I am, if you can imagine that!). The bracket is shown configured for ceiling mounting, but the hangers can also be fitted for wall mounting. I believe that the introduction of this bracket design, along with the modular FMT cases that hang in it, predates the GR movement by a few years.

parts: 24v Ingraham Z motor

24v Ingraham Z motor24v Ingraham Z motor

Here’s proof that the 24v GR(C)s really did use Ingraham Z drive motors—this one with a date stamp of 10-58 shown with its mounting bracket from a 1959 GRC. (I hope to have some 24v Ingraham Z clocks someday, along with the 24v version of the CA-1 buzzer.) Additionally, Gary’s recollection suggests that the supply of 24v Cramer 117 reset motors may have lasted for some time after the 120v version started to be fitted with Synchron 640 motors.

parts: components of 108-448 kit

components of 108-448 kit

And we also have the collection of parts included in the 108-448 kit, including the 1968+ adjustment pillar, designed to replace an out-of-production Ingraham Z drive motor or worn back plate (see the 108-448 kit instructions); this one seemingly never used.


random other examples

In this section, I will post other people’s pictures that I have come across, showing interesting examples of GRCs, on eBay or otherwise. (And if you send me interesting pictures, they might end up here—this is a warning!)

SET 100-001 GRC masterSET 100-001 GRC masterSET 100-001 GRC masterSET 100-001 GRC masterSET 100-001 GRC masterSET 100-001 GRC masterSET 100-001 GRC masterSET 100-001 GRC master

Up first from eBay, we have an actual SET 100-001 GRC steel-case master clock (that I didn’t buy because the seller understood not the value of such a thing, if I remember right). It is shown without program tapes; and the drive motor is a recent replacement. It appears as though this one has the actual flush-mount backbox, also.

SET 100-003 GRC masterSET 100-003 GRC masterSET 100-003 GRC masterSET 100-003 GRC masterSET 100-003 GRC masterSET 100-003 GRC masterSET 100-003 GRC masterSET 100-003 GRC masterSET 100-003 GRC masterSET 100-003 GRC masterSET 100-003 GRC masterSET 100-003 GRC masterSET 100-003 GRC master

And a SET 100-003 GRC master clock in a short steel-case without a program mechanism, that sold on eBay (I had the opportunity to buy it first, and I will probably regret not buying this one for the rest of my life). Note that this model seems to have the automatically motor-wound reserve movement, whereas the above 100-001 does not (100-151 is the motor-wound equivalent of the latter, according to the manual). Has the surface-mount backbox. Shown with a 120v GRC secondary with Ingraham Z drive motor that supposedly came from the same original installation, that is otherwise interesting because it was inspected November 30 but the date stamp is December 1959.

RMT-SQ-10 modRMT-SQ-10 modRMT-SQ-10 mod

A very interesting RMT-SQ-10, that has separate bolted-on dial markers. It seems to be constructed normally otherwise, but the only printing on the dial plate is the Standard logo. I think it is supposed to not have a second hand; exactly how they finished that detail would be very interesting to see more closely (especially if the movement is different). Note also how the bezel/rim is constructed for square RMT cases.

1963 FMT-SQ-101963 FMT-SQ-10

An FMT-SQ-10 from 1963.

3x Ingraham Z FMT-SQ-123x Ingraham Z FMT-SQ-12

And three FMT-SQ-12s that prove they really did make square cases with Ingraham Z drive motors. (Why I didn’t buy these, I have no clue. Of course, an Ingraham Z FMT-SQ-12 and an RMT-SQ-10 are exactly the cases I want to acquire, now. And multiples are always better!)

July 1961 FMT-10 ACCUMULATOR GRJuly 1961 FMT-10 ACCUMULATOR GRJuly 1961 FMT-10 ACCUMULATOR GRJuly 1961 FMT-10 ACCUMULATOR GRJuly 1961 FMT-10 ACCUMULATOR GR

Here are the remnants of an FMT-10 “ACCUMULATOR” GR, inspected July 1961 (according to the original filename), proving that those really were made for long enough to be fitted with Synchron drive motors. (This is the only one shown here that I’m glad I didn’t buy.)

Canadian Johnson Tempo RMT-12 GRC 24hrCanadian Johnson Tempo RMT-12 GRC 24hrCanadian Johnson Tempo RMT-12 GRC 24hr

An RMT-12 GRC with the 24-hour version of the Johnson Tempo dial, from Canada, that supposedly came from a school. Missing the hanging bracket (see #10); and the movement was carelessly reassembled. We should all be glad that I don’t own this one, as I would have an uncontrollable urge to peel the Johnson Controls sticker off of the dial—at least far enough to see if there’s a Standard logo under there! (I was contacted by the owner of this clock, regarding finding a new drive motor. I wonder if he ever got it fixed…)

Faraday RMT-12 GRC with transparent plastic movement platesFaraday RMT-12 GRC with transparent plastic movement plates

As a counterpoint to the Canadian one above, here is another RMT-12 GRC with the transparent plastic movement plates; this one made by Faraday (their version of the case and dial but without a logo) and seemingly never used. (Oddly enough, this one also seems to be missing the hanging bracket, but marks left in its place are not visible.)
 
Exactly when and for what reason those later companies made the plastic movement plates is unknown to me (okay, I think we all know the reason!). Despite that I am just certain they are absolutely miserable pieces of something unmentionable, I would rather like to have one of those plastic movements—not to use, of course; but to mount on an acrylic base for display purposes (as such, would also be a neat subject for videos demonstrating the operation of GRC movements)…


examples modified (by me)

#6-mod: FMT-12 GRC

#6
#6 front#6 back#6 movement#6 movement#6 movement#6 movement#6 movement#6 original parts#6 old mod

system supply: 120v 60Hz
drive motor: Ingraham Z
reset motor: Synchron 640
buzzer: CA-1
 
This is also one of my most favorite clocks. It is currently running in my bedroom, just as it has for years and probably (hopefully) will forever.
 
Shown is the result of my second experiment with adding a lockout microswitch to a GRC movement, completed 2014-01-13. It seems to work quite well, so far. The spacers between the front plate and case are shorter on a GR movement than a newer GRC, so I had to shave off most of the depth of the white ABS plastic base that I super-glued to the microswitch in order to get it to fit in there. Note that the GR parts that I modified are not original to this clock, but rather loose ones that I had; the original parts are still safely stored in a zip-bag, as always.
 
Originally, back in 2005, I swapped in the aluminum front plate (including correction bracket and hour gear) and the aluminum dustcover (I didn’t get one with this clock) from the original #1 movement. Other than looking rather bad, I have come to believe that the holes for the center shaft do not line-up exactly between those specific plates. There is still a slight mark around the number 2 on the dial where the minute hand dragged lightly at first (because the shaft was not square with the dial); and I believe that is the cause of the grinding away of the back tip of the seconds shaft. In short: don’t try this!
 
This clock also collected the much quieter Synchron 640 reset motor from #13 somewhere along the way; a modification that persists to this day. I describe the sound of those Cramer motors as some combination of a buzzer and a maraca (not entirely unlike the noise commonly made by the Haydon-style motors, actually), but they all make that obnoxious noise and don’t seem to have any problems.
 
((For the original GR version, see #6 above.))

#9-mod: RMT-12

#9 front
#9 back#9 movement#9 movement#9 movement#9 movement#9 paint

system supply: 120v 60Hz
drive motor: Ingraham Z
reset motor: Haydon
buzzer: CA-1
 
I rebuilt this one on 2012-03-24, using the original dial from #16 and some awesome circa-1956 GR movement parts. The movement front plate is that shiny zinc material (original to this clock). Too bad this case has those huge dents on the bezel. I still wonder how they got paint on the side of the dustcover like that…
 
((For the original version, see #9 above.))

#8-mod: RMT-12

#8 front
#8 back#8 movement (from #15)

system supply: 120v 60Hz
drive motor: Synchron 610
reset motor: Standard
buzzer: never installed
 
On 2012-03-26, I rebuilt and swapped in the original movement from #15, as I didn’t really want to ruin the shiny zinc original.
 
((For the original version, see #8 above.))

#12a/b: FMT-16

#12 front
#12 back#12 movement#12 movement#12 extra parts#12b front#12b movement mod#12b movement mod

notes: built from parts
 
I built #12a of a 1956 AR3, a Johnson 24vac GRC (with a bad drive motor), and a spare circa-1956 movement. It has the 16-inch version of the original printing of the modern dial, which looks a bit odd with the newer round-tip second hand (in my opinion). I always thought it was interesting how well that movement that I built from parts matches the clock overall. Unfortunately, I broke the glass that came on the newer one (it was on #17 at the time).
 
I rebuilt #12 as an AR3 with all its original parts on 2013-12-25; after having been a homemade GRC since 2005-04-03, over one-sixth of its life.
 
I used #12b for several experiments over the years. My attempt to make AR hands fit on a GRC movement, and my original 12-hour correction lockout microswitch experiment are both shown. The microswitch is a success, but I screwed something up with the shafts and sleeves (I made the seconds shaft a bit too short to ride where I wanted it to in there, I think)—don’t try that!

#1: FMT-12

#1 back

inspection date: June 17, 1963
system supply: 120v 60Hz
drive motor: Synchron 610
reset motor: Haydon
 
This is the first GRC that I bought, but actually the second one that I received.
 
Original dustcover now belongs to #6-mod; only original parts in the picture are the back plate and bezel clips. Finally scrapped on 2012-03-24.

#15: RMT-12

#15 back#15 movement#15 movement

inspection date: August 08, 1967
system supply: 120v 60Hz
drive motor: Synchron 610
reset motor: Standard
buzzer: never installed
notes: marked RMT, but I never had the rim (so, actually an FMT-12)
 
Finally scrapped on 2012-03-24.

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